Singapore government speed dating

In a sense, these numbers are not surprising as marriages worldwide are following the same trend: people are getting married later - or not at all.

Delaying marriage is reflective of most developed countries, says associate professor Paulin Straughan, a sociologist at National University of Singapore (NUS). I sometimes spend weekends with my elder brother and sister and their children.

E., 39, has a group of close female friends around her age who are all single.

According to her, they had channelled all their energies into their careers, but very little into finding husbands.

"We spent the previous decade telling ourselves that we're happy as we are, and if it happens, it happens," she says.

He found the constant search for romantic possibilities tiring and fruitless.The friends have less time to hang out and have fewer new friends to recommend as possible matches. We tend to get 'more single'." There have always been more women than men in her life.She was from a girls' school and mostly socialised with the same group of friends through secondary school, junior college and university.A friend once said, 'you're content with the love you already have from your family.''' MS WEE LE FONG, 40 The main reason for delaying marriage is "competing life goals", she says, such as a prolonged period in formal education and career. In the Marriage and Parenthood Study 2012, a survey commissioned by the National Population and Talent Division, 83 per cent of single respondents indicated that they wanted to get married.She adds: "When you're older, you're also more likely to know what you want and less likely to compromise." The median age for first-time grooms in Singapore rose from 29.1 years in 2003 to 30.2 years in 2013. If so many people want to put a ring on it, why is it not happening?

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