Dating enamelware

The well-known bowls, pots and kettles with shiny colors and distinctive pattern have a big sentimental value in our minds.

Grete Prytz Kittelsen (born in 1917) designed a numerous works using silver, vitreous enamel and plastic material.

Much lighter than the average kitchenware, easier to clean and less fragile than china, enamelware was very popular. The names Agateware and Graniteware caught on and came to be used interchangeably with generics such as porcelainware and speckleware.

Enamelware usually came in blue, red, purple, brown, green, pink, gray and white. Graniteware remains the name most widely used by collectors today.

White was a standard color on enamelware since that gave plates, mugs, ladles, and coffee pots a bright, sanitary appearance....

Some pieces sported a festive jumble of colors collectors call “end of day,” because it was made with a mix of leftover glazes. The once plentiful kitchenware is now harder to find.

Enamelware was manufactured again in the US during the 1960s, and is produced in various locations around the world today.

A century old muffin tin can be worth more than

Some pieces sported a festive jumble of colors collectors call “end of day,” because it was made with a mix of leftover glazes. The once plentiful kitchenware is now harder to find.

Enamelware was manufactured again in the US during the 1960s, and is produced in various locations around the world today.

A century old muffin tin can be worth more than $1,500 if it is in perfect condition, has a rare shape and color or the original label. If a tap on the bottom sounds “tinny” the piece is probably not from the early production.

Cathrineholm is an enamel cookware designed by Norwegian Grete Prytz Kittelsen.

This fabulous Scandinavian mid-century designs have become classics throughout the world.

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Some pieces sported a festive jumble of colors collectors call “end of day,” because it was made with a mix of leftover glazes. The once plentiful kitchenware is now harder to find.Enamelware was manufactured again in the US during the 1960s, and is produced in various locations around the world today.A century old muffin tin can be worth more than $1,500 if it is in perfect condition, has a rare shape and color or the original label. If a tap on the bottom sounds “tinny” the piece is probably not from the early production.Cathrineholm is an enamel cookware designed by Norwegian Grete Prytz Kittelsen.This fabulous Scandinavian mid-century designs have become classics throughout the world.

,500 if it is in perfect condition, has a rare shape and color or the original label. If a tap on the bottom sounds “tinny” the piece is probably not from the early production.

Cathrineholm is an enamel cookware designed by Norwegian Grete Prytz Kittelsen.

This fabulous Scandinavian mid-century designs have become classics throughout the world.

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